Tag Archives: editors

See you at the Pennwriters Conference!

***UPDATE*** 5/9:

AREA 6 MEMBERS: Join Lisa Kastner at Breakfast!

Lisa is our Pennwriters President and fellow Area 6 member. She coordinates the monthly Philadelphia Pennwriters critique group and supports writers throughout the region. Lisa is a great writer, a great leader, and a great person to know in Pennwriters.

Join Lisa at breakfast for a quick rally with other writers. Put faces to names, and make a new friend!

Jade Blackwater regrets to announce that after having fun day getting her hair done in Seattle to prepare for the Pennwriters Conference, she promptly came down with the flu and is unable to fly. Jade sends her deepest regrets, and encourages all writers to take full advantage of the Pennwriters Conference.

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We’re a week away from the 23rd Pennwriters Annual Writers’ Conference to be held in Lancaster, PA May 14-16 2010. This year’s conference features keynote speakers James Rollins and Elizabeth Kann, a stellar lineup of agents, editors, and authors for workshops and pitch sessions, plus designated party time at our ‘Heroes and Villains’ Saturday Night Masquerade Ball.

REGISTER NOW FOR THE 2010 PENNWRITERS CONFERENCE

So why should you attend? For starters, if you’re a member of Area 6 or another writer from the Mid-Atlantic, this is a fabulous opportunity to participate in a writers’ event right here in your region. Pennwriters offers a variety of workshops, networking, and promotional opportunities to help writers of all levels improve their work and build their business.

You don’t have to be from the East Coast to enjoy a Pennwriters event! Keynote James Rollins joins us from Northern California, and I’m flying in from Western Washington state to join the fun and support Area 6. The great thing about our membership is that we started with a strong community of writers from Pennsylvania, and have grown to include members from all across the US, and a few far-flung folks overseas. Our annual conference is the perfect time to put a face to a name/handle/avatar/penpal/writing-buddy.

LOOK FOR LISA KASTNER JADE BLACKWATER AT BREAKFAST

AREA 6 MEMBERS: Find me at breakfast – I’ll have something to catch the eye and make it easy to spot me – and please come introduce yourself! I want to meet members, shake hands, and introduce you to one another.

I’m on the hunt for a new volunteer for the Area 6 Representative position. We of Area 6 extend a hearty thank you to Bob Michalsky for his support of Pennwriters, and wish him all the best in his endeavors! If you are ready to support writers in your area and do more with Pennwriters, then I WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

GET READY TO PITCH YOUR WRITING

Here at the blog we’ve had Conference Coordinator Ayleen Stellhorn stop by with tips to prepare yourself to pitch, and a detailed interview discussing more about the conference.

Fellow Area 6 Member Ash Krafton has also prepared us with a link-rich post about pitching your work, plus more about editing the muse and navigating the transition from hobby writer to career author.

Follow @Pennwriters on Twitter for even more resources including tweets about Pennwriters activities as well as news, tips, and insights from members, guests, and other writing resources.

If you’re on Twitter, remember to use the #PWcon hashtag to tweet the conference, and use the #Pennwriters hashtag any time to chat about Pennwriters. Send us a @ (mention) or DM (direct message) and let us know you’re a member (tell us your name so we can find you in our roster). @Pennwriters follows Pennwriters members and guests.

If you’re on Facebook, be sure to join our Group and Page to keep up on news and announcements and to engage with our membership.

Contact me with any questions (or to be my last-minute volunteer angel).

See you all in Lancaster!

The Write Stuff Conference: Early Bird Registration Ends Feb 25

Greater Lehigh Valley Writers Group

(GLVWG) 17th Annual

THE WRITE STUFF Conference 2010

From the desk of Kathryn W. Craft, Pennwriters member and GLVWG 2010 Write Stuff Conference Chair:

We always think our conference is a wonderful resource, but this year’s addition of the two-day pre-conference workshop with James N. Frey makes it even more so. A special note to financially strapped Pennwriters who are already forking over the dough to attend the PW conference: you do not need to attend the Write Stuff conference to attend the workshop. At only $115 for two full days 8 am to 5 pm with Frey–who just told me he tends to run over his allotted time–“How to Plot Like the Pros” is an exceptional deal. Morning coffee and a box lunch for each day is included in the price.

Please note that our early bird registration ends Thursday with a Feb 25 postmark, as does the group hotel rate of $85.

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Rare East Coast Appearance by James N. Frey at Allentown’s 

Write Stuff Conference

 

Registration is now open for The Write Stuff, the annual conference of the Greater Lehigh Valley Writers Group (GLVWG) based in Southeastern Pennsylvania. Keynote for this year’s expanded event, March 25-27, 2010 at the Four Points Sheraton in Allentown, PA, will be internationally acclaimed workshop leader James N. Frey of Berkeley, CA, author of many popular writing guides including How to Write Damn Good Novel. A special addition will be a two-day pre-conference fiction workshop by Frey from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Thursday, March 25 and Friday, March 26, “How to Plot Like the Pros.”

Published authors presenting a choice of 18 craft and publishing sessions of interest to both fiction and nonfiction writers include acclaimed young adult and middle grade author Jordan Sonnenblick (Bethlehem, PA: Drums Girls & Dangerous Pie); Edgar Award-winner Molly Cochran (Bethlehem, PA: Grandmaster); historical romance writer Tracy MacNish (Lansdale, PA: Stealing Midnight); novelist, journalist and critic Bill Kent (Wynnewood, PA: Street Legal); young adult author Kitty Keswick (Harrisburg, PA: Freaksville); Morning Call “On the Cheap” columnist Spencer Soper (Bethelehem, PA); award-winning magazine writer Maureen Sangiorgio (Macungie, PA); and special guest from Connecticut, publishing guru David Wilk.

Conferees may sign up to pitch completed fiction manuscripts or nonfiction book proposals to agents and publishers that represent a broad spectrum of literary genre interests. This year literary agents include Kim Lionetti (BookEnds, LLC), Evan Goldfried (Jill Grinberg Literary Agency), Jessica Papin (Dystel and Goderich Literary Management), Eddie Schneider (JABberwocky Literary Agency), and Michelle Humphrey (Martha Kaplan Agency). Our guest publishers will be YA/MG publisher Laurie Edwards of Leap Books and Renee Rocco of Lyrical Press.

Conference fee includes Friday night reception, all conference presentations, and Saturday breakfast/lunch. Until Feb. 25, GLVWG members and students $100, non-members $120; after Feb. 25 all registration is $135. Additional fee of $115 for Pre-Conference Workshop includes box lunches for each day. Mail-in registration concludes March 12.

For more info: http://www.glvwg.org/conference

To download registration forms: http://www.glvwg.org/conference/register.htm

Conference blog, with presenter interviews: http://glvwgwritersconference.blogspot.com

Questions? Contact Write Stuff conference chair Kathryn Craft at WriteStuffAdmin [at] gmail [dot] com

#5: Top Ten Reasons to Attend the 2010 Pennwriters Conference

#5… Top-Notch Workshop Teachers

Registration for the 2010 Pennwriters Conference, May 14 – 16 in Lancaster, PA, opened January 11, 2010, and with apologies to a certain late night host, we’d like to present the top ten reasons to attend this year’s conference – in reverse order, of course.

The #5 reason to attend the 2010 Pennwriters Conference: Top-notch workshop teachers.

We’ve invited a long list of well-published authors, well-known agents, and highly qualified editors to teach the 35-plus one-hour workshops that will be held during the conference.

Some of the names you’ll recognize as Published Penns:

- Martha Johnson (Marta Perry) has written for Steeple Hill’s Love Inspired for years and just signed a three-book contract with Berkley for her Pleasant Valley Amish series

- Jonathan Maberry is following up his success with Patient Zero with book two of his Joe Ledger series

- Maria V. Snyder is writing her second series of fantasy books for MIRA;

- Loree Lough continues to write romance for Summerside Press

- Cyn Balog joins us after writing her debut YA fantasy for Delacourte

- Timons Esaias is adjunct faculty at Seton Hill in the Writing Popular Fiction MFA program

Other authors are just as well-published, but because they are special guests, you won’t recognize them as Pennwriters:

- Donna Fletcher now writes romance for Avon and has 18 novels to her name

- CJ Lyons writes medical thrillers for Berkley

- Ramona DeFelice Long is a professional writing coach and writes short stories and nonfiction

- Pam Jenoff writes historical fiction for MIRA

We’ve also invited a handful of industry professionals: Barbara Lalicki, David Pomerico, and Leis Pederson are editors; Jenny Bent, Janet Reid, Jennifer Jackson, Miriam Kriss, and Alex Glass are literary agents; Nancy Daversa is an executive producer for a local television station in Philadelphia, and Anita Nolan edits Sprouts for the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators.

To learn more, visit www.pennwriters.com, follow us on Twitter, or become our fan on Facebook.

Stay tuned for #4……

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2010 Pennwriters Conference – The Writer’s Craft
May 14 – 16, 2010
Eden Resort, Lancaster, PA
www.pennwriters.com
Ayleen Stellhorn, Pennwriters 2010 Conference Coordinator
conference2010[at]pennwriters[dot]com

New Location for the Pennwriters Philadelphia Critique Group

The Pennwriters Philadelphia Critique Group will now hold meetings at its new location:

525 S. 4th. St., Philadelphia, PA.  The building is on 4th St. between South St. and Lombard.  Take the elevator to the second floor; meetings will be held in the conference room.

The next meeting of the Pennwriters Philadelphia Critique Group (Coordinated by Pennwriters President Lisa Diane Kastner) will be held on Saturday, February 13 at 3 PM.

Critique Groups are open to all Pennwriters members.  If you are not a Pennwriters member you are invited to join us for up to three meetings and then we ask that you join.

Critique Rules:

1. Bring up to five pages of prose (following standard manuscript guidelines) to be read silently by your fellow attendees. Remember to bring multiple copies to share.
2. Initially, fellow writers will read the work silently and then provide feedback.
3. Feedback is provided with the best intent. Three positive aspects and three areas of focus for revision.  Focus on the positive and how to improve the piece.
4. If your work is being reviewed, keep an open mind. Don’t respond to the feedback initially. Wait until the last person has provided input and then you are welcome to ask questions.

This critique group is one of the many perks of joining Pennwriters.  To learn more about Pennwriters and its members, visit us at www.pennwriters.com.

Questions, comments, inquiries?  Contact coordinator Lisa Diane Kastner at lisadkastner[at]gmail[dot]com.

Read you there!

#6: Top Ten Reasons to Attend the 2010 Pennwriters Conference

#6… Intense Preconference Classes

Registration for the 2010 Pennwriters Conference, May 14 – 16 in Lancaster, PA, opened January 11, 2010, and with apologies to a certain late night host, we’d like to present the top ten reasons to attend this year’s conference – in reverse order, of course.

The #6 reason to attend the 2010 Pennwriters Conference: intense
preconference classes.

[Note: Application materials must be received by February 11.]

The #6 reason actually comprises four reasons: two full day and two half day preconference seminars on May 13, the day before the conference. Our goal with these classes is to provide writers who are a little farther along in their “journey” with an intense, personal experience that includes direct feedback on their work from the instructor. Registration for these classes opens January 11, class sizes are limited, and in three of the four classes, participants are chosen by the instructors. Application materials must be received by February 11. Follow the links below to learn more.

Two Full-Day Seminars

Fiction Writing with Timons Esaias
Join Tim, an instructor in Seton Hill’s MFA program, for a full day of instruction on how to make your manuscript shine. Requirements: Must have a finished first draft of a novel; instructor will be critiquing your first three chapters prior to class. Limited to 15 writers.

Nonfiction Writing with Jonathan Maberry

Multi-published in fiction and nonfiction, Jonathan will help you fine-tune your outline and idea, and delve into the whys and hows of nonfiction publishing. Requirements: Just a killer idea for a nonfiction book. Limited to 15 writers.

Two Half-Day Seminars
Crafting Your Fiction Query Package with CJ Lyons
This class is designed to help you get your work in front of an agent or editor. CJ, an award-winning and best-selling author, will critique your query letter and focus in class on blurbs, high concepts, pitches, and long and short synopses. Requirements: Must have a finished first draft of a novel. Limited to 16 writers.

Plotting and Subplotting with Loree Lough
Want to know more about plotting before you get started on your work of fiction? Stuck in the middle of your current WIP? Join Loree as she walks you through all you need to know about plots and subplots and their job in your manuscript. Requirements: An idea for a fiction book. No class limit.

Note: Fees for these four workshops are not included in the weekend workshop price. Acceptance into classes with limits is based on the instructors’ choices. Full application instructions are included in the individual listings.

To learn more, visit www.pennwriters.com, follow us on Twitter, or become our fan on Facebook.

Stay tuned for #5……

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2010 Pennwriters Conference – The Writer’s Craft
May 14 – 16, 2010
Eden Resort, Lancaster, PA
www.pennwriters.com
Ayleen Stellhorn, Pennwriters 2010 Conference Coordinator
conference2010[at]pennwriters[dot]com

#7: Top Ten Reasons to Attend the 2010 Pennwriters Conference

#7… Great Value for Your Money

Registration for the 2010 Pennwriters Conference, May 14 – 16 in Lancaster, PA, opened January 11, 2010, and with apologies to a certain late night host, we’d like to present the top ten reasons to attend this year’s conference – in reverse order, of course.

The #7 reason to attend the 2010 Pennwriters Conference: great value for your money.

At $225 for members for three days of programming, Pennwriters still has one of the most reasonable fees for writers conferences nationwide. We also allow conference goers to pick and choose from a variety of extras so they can tailor their costs to their wallets. The base price of $225 includes breakfast Saturday, the keynote lunch Saturday, 10 workshops (we’ve got about 40 to choose from), agent/editor pitch appointments and read-and-critiques (available on a first-registered, first-assigned basis), author tea and book signing, and of course all the coffee you care to drink.

Optional add-ons for Friday include your choice of a networking lunch or the Published Author’s Luncheon with special guest former Random House editor Liz Scheier, the Friday keynote dinner with James Rollins, Saturday night’s masquerade “Heroes and Villians,” and a breakfast buffet on Sunday.

But as they tell you in the television commercials, it’s those intangibles – connections with a top-notch agent, the possibility of avoiding the slush pile, finding the perfect critique partner, discovering a writers group that meets near your home, learning whether an MFA is for you – that are priceless.

To learn more, visit www.pennwriters.com, follow us on Twitter, or become our fan on Facebook.

Stay tuned for #6……

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2010 Pennwriters Conference – The Writer’s Craft
May 14 – 16, 2010
Eden Resort, Lancaster, PA
www.pennwriters.com
Ayleen Stellhorn, Pennwriters 2010 Conference Coordinator
conference2010[at]pennwriters[dot]com

Feature Writer Interview: Ayleen Stellhorn

2010 Pennwriters Annual ConferenceToday it is my pleasure to introduce you to Ayleen Stellhorn, freelance writer and editor, Pennwriters Member, and 2010 Pennwriters Conference Coordinator.  Ayleen works hard, balances multiple projects, and still greets everyone with a smile (you can even “see” her smile in her friendly emails).

You can contact Ayleen via email with questions about this year’s Pennwriters Conference at this address: conference2010[at]pennwriters[dot]com.

[Additional details are available at the end of this interview.]

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JB: Greetings Ayleen!  Thanks for joining us for an interview at the Pennwriters Area 6 HQ blog.

AS: Nice to be invited, Jade. Thank you.

JB: First, tell us a little about yourself.  What do you write?  When did you first join Pennwriters?

AS: I write newspaper and magazine articles mostly. My articles have appeared in the Hanover Evening Sun, the Chambersburg Public Opinion, and the Lancaster Intelligencer Journal. Right now I’m writing regularly for Lancaster Farming Journal and Adams Electric’s corporate magazine PennLines, and I just signed a contract to author a book featuring contemporary hooked rugs. I also do a lot of freelance editing for publishers of craft and hobby books. I’ve been a member of Pennwriters for about 10 years.

JB: I understand that this isn’t your first time volunteering as the Pennwriters Conference Coordinator.  Could you tell us a little about your experiences, and what brings you back to organize the 2010 Conference in Lancaster, Pennsylvania?

AS: I coordinated the 2008 conference in Lancaster. We had an amazing turnout, and overall, everything went really well. Award-winning literary writer and Princeton University professor Joyce Carol Oates was our keynote speaker; Susan Meier, Mary Jo Rulnick, Brian Butko, and Valerie Malmont were a few of our workshop presenters; and a record 236 people attended. We had a lot of firsts that year, including the preconference intensive classes, an author as a Friday keynote, and the networking lunch. I decided to volunteer one more year because I wanted to do a couple things differently: the first was a new hotel and the second was a commercial fiction writer as a keynote. So in 2010, we’re at the Eden Resort in Lancaster and we have adventure-thriller writer James Rollins as our Friday night keynote.

JB: This year I’ll be joining everyone in Lancaster for my first writers’ conference ever.  Can you tell a newbie like me what to expect?  What would be the *top three* things a writer could do to make the most of the Pennwriters Conference experience?

AS: Top three things for a newbie… Let’s see…

Be prepared to be overwhelmed is one. A lot goes on in a very short time, and your brain will reach overload quickly. I’ve been to five conferences, and I always walk out of each workshop with my head spinning with ideas. Even if you think you’ll remember something, write it down anyways. Odds are you’ll get another great idea — or piece of advice or link to follow — at the next workshop, and that first idea will be long gone.

Be ready to talk is two. If you’re generally the person who sits back and listens to conversations flowing around you, make a conscious decision to not be that type of person at the conference. Introduce yourself to the folks sitting at your breakfast table; find out what the person sitting next to you in a workshop likes to write; join a group of people hanging out in the hospitality room or at the bar; volunteer for one of the little jobs like moderator or Penn Pal. And along those same lines, be prepared to answer the question, “What do you write?/What are you writing?” in one or two sentences. You’ll get asked that more times than you can count.

Latch on to the positive is three. Getting published in any form takes a lot of skill, but it also takes a lot of persistence: you need to be in the right place at the right time with the right manuscript. You’ll hear lots of gloom-and-doom statistics at a writers conference dealing with how many queries an agent receives and how few they accept, or how many rejection letters an author received before he or she got published, or how many writers write but quit before their manuscript is even completed. Don’t get discouraged. Focus on the encouraging personal stories and listen to the advice of the agents and editors we’ve invited.

JB: Event planning is a huge undertaking – especially for something like this.  Can you tell us about some of the joys and trials of volunteering as the Conference Coordinator?  What advice would you give to other volunteers who organize events for nonprofits?

AS: The joys far outweigh the trials. If they didn’t, I wouldn’t be back for my second shot at this! I love seeing a writer make a connection with an editor or agent. I love to sit at dinner and hear people talk about how their characters are running their lives. I love providing an opportunity for writers to learn and grow and just be writers in whatever genre, whether that’s nonfiction, thrillers, comics, magazines, poetry, corporate communications…. The trials (and they are sometimes devils) are in the details. Putting together a quality three-day program that will appeal to a broad range of writers is a real challenge. Lining up everything the editors, agents, and presenters need — from travel arrangements to special room set-ups — can fall through the cracks with one missed e-mail. And making sure all the little things are covered, like codes to book rooms online and full coffee pots 24/7, is sometimes overwhelming. My advice to other volunteers who organize events like ours would be to believe in what you’re doing, and be a list-maker!

JB: I know that readers can get the scoop if they follow Pennwriters on Twitter, join the Pennwriters Group on Facebook, or visit the Official Pennwriters website, but please tell us again: What are the highlights for the 2010 Pennwriters Conference?

AS: Highlights:

Keynote James Rollins, author of adventure thrillers, the movie novelization for the most recent Indiana Jones movie, and a new series of young adult thrillers. Watch his videos at www.jamesrollins.com to see why we think he’s going to be an excellent keynote.

Eight agents and editors: Jennifer Jackson, Donald Maass Agency; Jenny Bent, The Bent Agency; Miriam Kriss, Irene Goodman Agency; Alex Glass, Trident Media; Janet Reid, Fine Print Literary; Barbara Lalicki, senior vice president and editorial director at HarperCollins Children; David Pomerico, assistant editor at Del Rey Spectra; and Leis Pederson, associate editor at Berkley. They’ll be hearing pitches, teaching classes, and critiquing first pages.

Preconference classes. Attend in-depth and interactive full-day and half-day seminars with Tim Esaias (fiction), Jonathan Maberry (nonfiction), Loree Lough (plotting), and CJ Lyons (fiction queries).

Three days of workshops. The conference fee includes more than 40 to choose from, and all the instructors are published authors or industry professionals.

JB: We’ve held the Pennwriters Conference in Lancaster before.  For visitors who’ve never been to Lancaster (or perhaps even Pennsylvania), what are some of the other local perks you might suggest they check out?

AS: Take an extra day to wander through Amish country. (The city is filled with tourist attractions, which give you a good overview of the culture, but there’s nothing like checking out the roadside stands and sharing the byways with buggies.) Go shopping at the outlets. Play golf at the Host. Eat at a smorgasbord. See a play at the Dutch apple. Check out Central Market. Visit Landis Valley Farm Museum.

JB: How can writers, editors, agents, publishers, book sellers, readers, etc. help to get the word out about the Pennwriters conference?

AS: I’d like to ask folks to simply drop our name and website into whatever social media they’re using. Mention us in your Facebook status, twitter about a favorite author who will be teaching, write about us in your blog, list the event info on your own website. I’ve also got fliers that you can hang up at local coffee shops, bookstores, libraries, etc. Every little bit will help. We’ve got an amazing program, and I want to share that with as many writers as possible.

JB: Where and how can writers register for the 2010 Pennwriters Conference?

AS: Online, go to www.pennwriters.com, click on Conference and then Register. If you prefer to send a check by mail, download and print a registration form at the Pennwriters website, or call or email me so I can send you one. Registration forms will also be printed in January-February 2010 issue of The Penn Writer newsletter. (Remember to book your room early. The Eden [1-866-801-6430] is a gorgeous facility but much smaller than the Host.)

JB: Finally, as a writer and journalist (and all-around awesome person), what words of wisdom or inspiration would like to share for writers and artists?

AS: Always end an interview with a question that strokes your source’s ego and makes her feel appreciated. :) Nicely done, Jade.

Ayleen, we thank you again for joining us and sharing some behind-the-scenes insight.  See you at the Pennwriters Conference in May 2010!


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2010 Pennwriters Conference – The Writer’s Craft

When: May 14 – 16, 2010

(May 13, Preconference Seminars)

Where: Eden Resort, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA

POC: Ayleen Stellhorn, Pennwriters 2010 Conference Coordinator

Web: www.pennwriters.com

Email: conference2010[at]pennwriters[dot]com

Facebook: Be a Fan of the Pennwriters Annual Writers Conference

Twitter: Follow Pennwriters on Twitter

LinkedIn: Join Pennwriters on LinkedIn

Listserve: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PennwritersConference/